wtfcg2

Are You Over Your Head In Credit Card Debt?

Afraid of Losing Your Home to Foreclosure? What If You Could Legally Keep Your Home?

Commerce Coach Helps Texas Couple Settle $1,006,000 in Debts in Only Three Months, Without Tapping Their Bank Account!

Discover the Shocking Facts About "Bank Loans" the Bankers Don't Want You to Know! Facts You Can Use to Win!

You are facing foreclosure. What can you do? If you want to keep your home, you need to know the TRUTH about today’s mortgages that the banks don’t want you to know! In a minute you’ll read about how some of our members kept their homes. People like Rey, a developer who kept five properties that paid him $13,000 to $15,000 a month, while the banks collected nothing! Before you go thinking “Awww, poor banks!” You should know the banks lost not a dime they were entitled to.

If you’re like most Americans facing foreclosure, something happened that caused you to miss some payments. Maybe the “pandemic” caused you to shut the doors on your business. Maybe you lost your job. Whatever it was, it was beyond your control.

Now the bank wants to sell your home so it can recover some of the funds it loaned you. And, after all, it has the right to recover those funds. Right?

About twenty-five years ago I used to believe that too. But now, after years of being in the trenches, dealing with crooked foreclosure attorneys and their clients, the banks, I know better.

I know that the “loans” that you think happened never actually happened. I know that the language in the promissory note that you signed made bogus claims, claims that are clearly not true. For example, before you even signed the note, the language on the note claims you have already received the loan! How did that happen!? And, why would a bank hand out money without a signed promise to pay?! It wouldn’t!

As for why the loans “never happened” we’ll get to that in a minute. For now, let’s deal with the “elephant in the room” why most of the families facing foreclosure simply walk away. And, keep in mind, many of them walk away leaving everything behind: furniture, computers, stereos, and TVs -–the works!

They do it because they’re crushed, defeated, sad, and embarrassed. They just want to put this tragedy behind them.

Imagine how different things would have been for these poor souls if they had just known the truth! What if they had discovered (as you are about to discover) that the bank had tricked them? What if they had known that the loan was not a loan at all, but rather an exchange of notes? Would they have just walked away? I don’t think so!

I think they would have been mad as hell. And, now that you know the truth, you should be mad too.

In your case, you exchanged your promissory note for Federal Reserve Notes. Both notes are “promises to pay” at some future date. So, the question we have to ask is… legally speaking,  what is the difference between your promise to pay and the FED’s promise to pay?

Does the FED have some kind of monopoly on notes?

No. And besides, the FED isn’t “federal” at all. It is not part of the government. But, clearly, the folks behind it wanted to suggest or infer that it is. Otherwise, why would they call their company the “Federal Reserve?”

As for why the “loan” never happened, we now know that an “exchange” of notes isn’t a loan. It is an exchange! But, here is where it gets interesting.

Walker F. Todd, former legal officer for the Federal Reserve Banks of New York and Cleveland, and an “expert witness” explained in a recent court case how the note is bo th an asset and a liability:

“When a bank accepts bullion, coin, currency, checks, drafts, promissory notes, or any other similar instruments from customers and deposits or records the instruments as assets, it must record offsetting liabilities that match the assets that it accepted from customers. The liabilities represent the amounts that the bank owes the customers, funds accepted from customers.” (See the definition of “deposit” at 12 USC §1813).

“Funds accepted from customers” –i.e. your note! I bet you didn’t know that your “note” qualifies as “funds!” To be clear, that means that when you handed the bank your promissory note, the bank had to treat it like any other deposit. You deposit $100 the bank owes you $100. When the bank deposits your note for $400,000, it owes you $400,000. So, who made the bank a loan of $400,000? You did! FACT is…

You provided the funds for the "loan"

And, in case you’re wondering how your note became so valuable take a look at House Joint Resolution 192. In HJR 192 the government admitted, after it went bankrupt, that all future currency would be backed by the people and their assets! That means you are the creditor and the U.S. is the debtor, which means every note you write becomes an obligation of the United States!

So, when the bank cuts you a check so you can buy your house, your deposited note has already paid off the so-called mortgage, and you owe the bank nothing. You never got a loan. You and the bank only exchanged notes!

In its book, Modern Money Mechanics, page 6, the Federal Reserve admits it:

“Of course, they [banks] do not really pay out loans from the money they receive as deposits… What they do when they make loans is to accept promissory notes in exchange for credits to the borrowers’ transaction account. Loans (assets) and deposits (liabilities) both rise” by the amount of the Note. Modern Money Mechanics

 

If you’re like most Americans facing foreclosure, something happened that caused you to miss some payments. Maybe the “pandemic” caused you to shut the doors on your business. Maybe you lost your job. Whatever it was, it was beyond your control.

Now the bank wants to sell your home so it can recover some of the funds it loaned you. And, after all, it has the right to recover those funds. Right?

About twenty-five years ago I used to believe that too. But now, after years of being in the trenches, dealing with crooked foreclosure attorneys and their clients, the banks, I know better.

I know that the “loans” that you think happened never actually happened. I know that the language in the promissory note that you signed made bogus claims, claims that are clearly not true. For example, before you even signed the note, the language on the note claims you have already received the loan! How did that happen!? And, why would a bank hand out money without a signed promise to pay?! It wouldn’t!

As for why the loans “never happened” we’ll get to that in a minute. For now, let’s deal with the “elephant in the room” why most of the families facing foreclosure simply walk away. And, keep in mind, many of them walk away leaving everything behind: furniture, computers, stereos, and TVs -–the works!



They do it because they’re crushed, defeated, sad, and embarrassed. They just want to put this tragedy behind them.

Imagine how different things would have been for these poor souls if they had just known the truth! What if they had discovered (as you are about to discover) that the bank had tricked them? What if they had known that the loan was not a loan at all, but rather an exchange of notes? Would they have just walked away? I don’t think so!

I think they would have been mad as hell. And, now that you know the truth, you should be mad too.

In your case, you exchanged your promissory note for Federal Reserve Notes. Both notes are “promises to pay” at some future date. So, the question we have to ask is… legally speaking, what is the difference between your promise to pay and the FED’s promise to pay?

Does the FED have some kind of monopoly on notes?

No. And besides, the FED isn’t “federal” at all. It is not part of the government. But, clearly, the folks behind it wanted to suggest or infer that it is. Otherwise, why would they call their company the “Federal Reserve?”

As for why the “loan” never happened, we now know that an “exchange” of notes isn’t a loan. It is an exchange! But, here is where it gets interesting.

Walker F. Todd, former legal officer for the Federal Reserve Banks of New York and Cleveland, and an “expert witness” explained in a recent court case how the note is both an asset and a liability:

“When a bank accepts bullion, coin, currency, checks, drafts, promissory notes, or any other similar instruments from customers and deposits or records the instruments as assets, it must record offsetting liabilities that match the assets that it accepted from customers. The liabilities represent the amounts that the bank owes the customers, funds accepted from customers.” (See the definition of “deposit” at 12 USC §1813).

“Funds accepted from customers” –i.e. your note! I bet you didn’t know that your “note” qualifies as “funds!” To be clear, that means that when you handed the bank your promissory note, the bank had to treat it like any other deposit. You deposit $100 the bank owes you $100. When the bank deposits your note for $400,000, it owes you $400,000. So, who made the bank a loan of $400,000? You did! FACT is…

You provided the funds for the “loan”

And, in case you’re wondering how your note became so valuable take a look at House Joint Resolution 192. In HJR 192 the government admitted, after it went bankrupt, that all future currency would be backed by the people and their assets! That means you are the creditor and the U.S. is the debtor, which means every note you write becomes an obligation of the United States!

So, when the bank cuts you a check so you can buy your house, your deposited note has already paid off the so-called mortgage, and you owe the bank nothing. You never got a loan. You and the bank only exchanged notes!

In its book, Modern Money Mechanics, page 6, the Federal Reserve admits it:

“Of course, they [banks] do not really pay out loans from the money they receive as deposits… What they do when they make loans is to accept promissory notes in exchange for credits to the borrowers’ transaction account. Loans (assets) and deposits (liabilities) both rise” by the amount of the Note. Modern Money Mechanics

So, if the bank cannot “loan” the bank’s or depositor’s funds, where does the money come from when the bank makes a so-called loan? That’s right! It comes from you! And, we know a “loan” never happened because, no matter what they say an “exchange” is not a loan!

What Can You Do?

Having gotten this far, you must be wondering, “What can I do about my pending foreclosure? (Or, what can I do about my massive credit card debt?) After all, the bank isn’t going to just back off and confess that it defrauded me. Right?”

Right you are! The senior officers of the banks know exactly what they’ve done. They know precisely how they’ve swindled billions of people, not just in America, but worldwide! So, no, they won’t back off.

But, that doesn’t mean you can’t win!

To illustrate my point, let me tell you about one of our members, my friend, Jed Lambeth. Jed came to me for help when an attorney claiming to represent Bank of America sued him for a credit card debt. If I were an attorney, I might have charged him for walking him into court, but he would have lost. Attorneys think their job is to argue in court (rather than actually solving the problem). In this case, Jed couldn’t dispute that he had accepted the Bank of America credit card and had stopped making payments!

So, what did Jed do to turn things around? (And, what could you do?)

Simple, he signed a rescission of his signature on the credit card agreement for good cause: the bank neglected to mention that the credit card agreement was actually a promissory note; that banks don’t actually make loans, and that Jed had every right to rescind the agreement within three days from the time the bank fully disclosed these details. Jed offered to return all the money the bank actually lent him and gave the bank ten days to respond. The bank remained silent, tacitly agreeing to Jed’s terms: Jed’s signature was officially rescinded and the bank tacitly admitted that Jed owed them nothing.

What happened next? I’ll let Jed tell you in his own words:

 

I was being sued by Bank of America. We filed a Notice of Rescission with the bank; we filed a motion to dismiss our case. We went before the judge, who said, “I’ve never ruled against Bank of America. But, Mr. Lambeth, this is the first time! The case is dismissed!” Thank you!

JED LAMBETH, NORTH CAROLINA

Like Jed, you need a real solution!

Not the typical “get in line,” to go to court and get screwed rubbish most people are stuck with! (Remember what the Judge said, “I’ve never ruled against Bank of America.”)

That’s where we come in. My name is Rob McKee. For the past twenty-five years, I’ve been a commerce coach, helping members of our private group handle difficult, and sometimes impossible problems.

Why do I say “impossible”? Because if you went out and asked 100 attorneys to take on one of these cases 99 (if not 100) would say “No. We can’t help you.” The fact is, attorneys like to win. Present them with a “loser” case where you want them to prepare a rescission and do an “administrative process” and take it into court, and they’ll say “No thanks.” I know because I’ve talked to many attorneys trying to get them to take on “crazy”, “difficult” cases where we are making “impossible claims”, and they always say “No!” because they have no strategy that can fix the problem or delay the inevitable. On the other hand…

I ‘ve said “Yes!” to some cases that appeared to be impossible.

When Gena and Layton Sawyer came to me with over one million dollars in debts, I would have told you that settling all one million in just three months was very unlikely, if not impossible!

After all, the Sawyers were being hounded by debt collectors every week on an FMHA loan for nearly $500,000 that the Sawyers couldn’t begin to pay. To make matters worse, the bank was threatening to foreclose on a cattle feedlot the Sawyers had bought from the bank on the bank’s assurance that a state certificate to feed cattle was “grandfathered in!”

As you may have guessed, the State of Texas had shut down their feed lot, due to “no certificate” leaving the Sawyers without the means to pay the mortgage! That’s right! The bank lied! And, despite their fraud, the bankers were still going to foreclose!

Gena was furious. All she wanted from me was help in picking a law firm so she could sue the bank! I suggested that it would be better to try negotiating a settlement with the bank first, because a lawsuit would be expensive, and could take months or years to settle. And besides, the bank had more money to spend on lawyers than the Sawyers did!

Gena doubted the banker would agree to a meeting, because the last time they had talked she had lost her temper and had “cussed him out.” I told her I had “magic words” that would get the banker to agree to a meeting. “Gena,” I said, “just tell him, ‘We’re ready to settle.'” She tried my suggestion, and the meeting was set.

An Easy Secret For Winning

Before I tell you how Gena went about getting the bankers to agree to her terms for a settlement, I want to share one of the secrets our members use to win. I learned this secret from an attorney who claims he never loses a case!

“It’s simple,” he told me. “When I’m about to go head-to-head with my opponent, I come prepared. Most attorneys are lazy and come to court unprepared expecting to bluff me or negotiate. I always come prepared. When they don’t agree to my terms, I know I can go into court and win, because I’m ready, and they’re not.”

I knew Gena would win because I knew the bank never put any of the bank’s (or depositors’) money at risk! In addition, the bank had already foreclosed on another rancher to obtain the feedlot. So, really, the bank had nothing to lose. On the other hand, if word got out that it had defrauded the Sawyers, the Sheriff could be called in to investigate, maybe make an arrest, and the bank’s reputation would be ruined!

Of course, I also made sure Gena was prepared: We knew the bankers had lied when they sold the Sawyers the cattle feedlot. I also knew that any contract involving fraud (called fraud in the factum) was void! Would the bankers risk public exposure of their fraud if Gena went to the Sheriff? Not likely!

Instead of risking a fortune to go to court, we’d planned to hold a little court of our own. I had Gena gather all the evidence, execute affidavits, and bring a witness. When she and Layton walked into the meeting, she had a digital recorder clipped to her purse recording everything. “It’s not for evidence,” I explained. “It’s to give your witness (a fellow rancher) perfect recall!” Gena said, “Oh, I like that!”

Gena handed out a stack of sworn testimony and other evidence to each of the three bankers that were there, gave one to her husband and one to her friend the rancher, and remained standing while everyone else took a seat. I had told Gena to read through all of the pages, and she did. At the end, she said, “make me an offer,” sat down, and shut up.

The bankers took a few minutes to confer, and said, “No foreclosure. How about we wipe out the whole thing?” Gena said, “Offer accepted.” The bogus loan was canceled and funds were returned. As for the $500,000 FMHA loan, Gena sent the bank its own bill back stamped with the words “Accepted for Value” (meaning Gena approved the invoice for payment as an obligation of the United States) and instructions for obtaining settlement from the United States. The dunning calls stopped. The settlement was accepted. As Gena said…

The outlook was bleak, to say the least! As the situation now stands, through your program more than $56,000 in credit card debt is [settled], the government FMHA debt of nearly one-half million has been dealt with… a local bank debt of more than $450,000 has been handled in lieu of foreclosure. Thank you so much!

GENA AND LAYTON SAWYER, TEXAS

It’s not over, even when they say it’s over!

A few years ago I was approached by a friend, Jumaane. I had helped his parents with a few legal problems on properties they were renting out. He asked if I could help with a foreclosure and eviction that had already happened! The trustee had foreclosed on the Brisbys’ own home a year earlier, and the court had already granted the bank its request for eviction!

I tried to tell Jumaane I doubted I could help him, but, he insisted that he wanted me to at least try so his parents wouldn’t have their home taken from them. I told him the odds were bad and that I couldn’t promise him his parents would be able to keep their home. He begged me to take on the case anyway, and I reluctantly agreed.

After a quick evaluation, I knew that there was no actual loan; that the bank didn’t have the note, and had no basis to foreclose. So, I wrote up a conditional acceptance of the trustee’s offer to foreclose on the Brisbys’ home providing that he explained how he managed to do it without any actual authority to sell the property!

Guess what? He didn’t answer! No big surprise! But, here is the rub: As a “trustee” the attorney has a mandatory duty to answer. By remaining silent, despite his duty to respond, he effectively agreed to the terms of the contract! Because, under the law, silence is acquiescence!

Contract?! you say. What contract?!

You’re going to love this! You see when the trustee illegally sold the property, that was an “offer in commerce!” To form a binding contract, the Brisbys only had to accept his offer, dictate terms, and wait for a refusal (which the trustee didn’t bother to send)!

The terms were simple: Unless he objected, the trustee would agree that the foreclosure was fraudulent and, as trustee, it was his duty to rescind the sale and return the property to the Brisbys. We prepared all the necessary paperwork on the trustee’s behalf rescinding the sale and had Jumaane file it with the County Recorder.

I warned Jumaane that the clerk would probably refuse to record the papers. But, Jumaane had been going into the County Recorder’s office for years, helping out his parents, and the clerks behind the counter knew him. So, he didn’t run into any problems getting the papers filed.

Next, I coached his mother, Bernice, on what to say if the Sheriff showed up to evict them. Luckily, Jumaane had already been to the Sheriff’s office and had dropped off a copy of the recorded papers, explaining that his parents were the owners of the property and not the bank.

The Sheriff never showed up and for the last several years, the Brisbys have remained in their house. The alleged “mortgage holder,” Freddy Mac, has done nothing.

What Other Members Have To Say

Bruce Williams was referred to me in the hope that I could help him handle some credit card debt and prevent his car from being taken by the “lender.” So, did the bank actually ever “make a loan” on the car? No! It was just another “exchange of notes!” When the bank’s agent came to repossess the car, he was shocked when Bruce refused and presented him with legal papers. The agent crumpled up the papers, tossed them on the floor, and demanded the keys. Bruce picked up the papers and handed them back to him explaining that if he took the car he would be guilty of “grand theft auto” because the “debt” had already been settled! Not sure what to do, the agent left and Bruce kept his car!

“I was facing bankruptcy. It was going to be embarrassing, and humiliating. After working with you I eliminated over $50,000 of credit card debt and over $20K of secured debt. You helped me understand the TRUTH about our banking system and the fraud. Your support was incredible.

Thank You, RJ.

BRUCE WILLIAMS, CALIFORNIA

Got a mortgage that you need to settle? A few years ago I helped Mark Coutts walk away from a real estate closing table with an extra $143,000 in cash (beyond his official “equity”).

Thanks for the recent files. Just wanted to let you know I appreciate the help you’ve provided in dealing with debts and other issues. Since I signed up with you a year ago, I have been able to legally settle $170,349.00 in debts …provid[ing] the banks full settlement … without having to use my personal funds. Because of my recently acquired education, I was able to pocket an additional $143,000 at a real estate closing… ! What an amazing difference that knowledge has made in my life over the past year!

-MARK COUTTS, ATLANTA, GA

Is your Title Company in a back-stabbing mood? Are attorneys threatening to sue? Real estate investor and author, Stefan Kasian was facing a nasty lawsuit from one of the “big five” title companies when a mutual friend introduced him to me. Going to court as the defendant wasn’t an option. Judges notoriously favor banks, title companies, and attorneys! I agreed to handle Stefan’s pending suit out of court.

I had a situation with a title company several years ago. That’s how RJ was referred to me. We did a normal loan and the next thing you know, there’s a foreclosure, and the title company is trying to sue me on a deal that they title insured! …So through R.J’s technology, and some of the strategies that he’s developed, I was able to turn around a $187,000 lawsuit into something [where] they ran the other way screaming like a bunch of scared jackrabbits.

STEFAN KASIAN, TEXAS

Who Is This For?

Win the Foreclosure Game is mainly for people who are deeply in debt, cannot make the payments and don’t see a way out. It is for people who know something is wrong with our money system, our courts and our government, and, who want to learn how to “stand their ground” and fight back!

If you are ticked off that you’ve been deceived and want to find out more about how to legally keep your money and your home, then click the button below to book a call with me. You’ll be taken to my calendar where you can select a date and time convenient for you. Then you will be asked to fill out a short series of questions to help me understand your situation, so I’ll be better prepared to help you when we meet over the phone.

What to Expect

When we get together, you can relax. There will be no “pitch” and no “hard sell.” Actually just the opposite. I’m one man, and I can only help a limited number of active members in our private group at a time. Our call will be a consultation. I’ll listen to you and ask questions. It may take more than one call for me to find and recommend solutions. Once I do, if you’re ready, you may be invited to join our group to get the tools and education you’ll need to fight back and win.

As I’m sure you know, this is not for everyone. I’ve met folks who just can’t believe the banks would swindle everyone, or, that the government would permit such a thing! Some people are too afraid to find out just how bad things really are, or to take action. If that’s you, I can’t help you. Very likely no one can.

However, if you are ready to “take the red pill” and “see how deep the rabbit hole goes”, then click the button below. I will be delighted to get together with you and explore your options.

 
Click Here to Book A Call

Privacy Policy

Terms & Conditions / Disclaimer

IMPORTANT: Earnings and Legal Disclaimers

This site is not part of or endorsed by, Facebook, Google, Snapchat, Twitter or any social medial platform in any way.

All product names, logos, and brands are the property of their respective owners. All company, product, and service names used on this website are for identification purposes only. Use of these names, logos, and brands does not imply endorsement.

FACEBOOK is a trademark of FACEBOOK, Inc. YOUTUBE and GOOGLE are trademarks of GOOGLE, LLC. SNAPCHAT is a trademark of SNAP, Inc. TWITTER is a trademark of TWITTER, Inc.

All results stated above are not typical, I’m not implying you’ll duplicate them (or do anything for that matter). Any of my strategies and case studies are only estimates of what is possible. There is no assurance you’ll do as well or even close to as well as I have done or other clients. Results are based on many factors including luck, hard work, effort, and years of hard work. We have no way of knowing how well you will do, as we do not know you, your background, your business model, or your work ethic etc. Therefore, we do not guarantee or imply that you will get better results or save/make more money, or, that you will do as well, especially if the techniques are never implemented. If you rely upon our figures; you must accept the risk of not doing as well as we are an established commerce consultant over many years of research and work.

All products and services are for educational and informational purposes only. Use caution and seek the advice of qualified professionals. Check with your attorney, accountant, or professional advisor, before acting on this or any information, and ensure you are within all legal regulations. If advice concerning legal or related matters is needed, the services of a fully qualified professional should be sought out before any action is taken. All WTFG information, products, and services are not intended for use as a source of legal or accounting advice. You should be aware of any laws which govern business transactions or other business practices in your country and state as they can differ greatly.

The Information on this website and provided from or through this website is general in nature and is not specific to you the user or anyone else. You should not make any decision, financial, investment, trading, or otherwise, based on any of the information presented in this video or website without undertaking independent due diligence and consultation with a professional broker or financial advisory. You understand that you are using any and all Information available on or through this site at your own risk.

The rules, regulations, and laws concerning credit cards are different from state to state and country to country. Applications and agreements vary from company to company. Be sure to thoroughly read everything.

Users of our products, services, and website are advised to do their own due diligence when it comes to making decisions, and all information, products, and services that have been provided should be independently verified by your own qualified professionals. Our information, products, and services on Win the Foreclosure Game should be carefully considered and evaluated, before reaching a decision on whether to rely on them. You agree that our company is not responsible for the success or failure of your decisions relating to any information presented by WTFG or our company products or services.

Win The Foreclosure Game – 3216 Hopkins Avenue, Halethorpe Maryland 21227 United States